• Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26
  • Parashat : Behaalotcha
  • Candle Lighting: 17:20
  • Mincha & Arvit on Friday: 17:30
  • Shacharit & Mussaf on Shabbat: 9:00
  • Shabbat Ends: 17:26

What is TALI?

The TALI (Hebrew acronym for “Enriched Jewish Studies”) network of schools provides a pluralistic Jewish Studies program to tens of thousands of school children in 184 public schools and pre-schools throughout Israel.

 

TALI offers the middle-way in Israel for Jewish education, tradition and the awakening of Jewish identity.

 

Why does Israel need TALI?

Every Jewish child in Israel deserves a Jewish education. But most go without.

 
Jews in Israel are deeply divided along religious and secular fault-lines – a divide that tears at the fabric of Israeli society. For sixty years, this division has been fostered by Israel’s school system which operates only two educational streams:  religious and secular.

 
Yet most Jewish Israelis define themselves as neither Orthodox nor secular, but as traditional. They identify with Jewish culture and heritage, but feel alienated by a rigid, politicized religious establishment.  By sending their children to secular public schools, most Israeli parents have forfeited their children’s right to a Jewish education.

 
TALI brings Jewish learning to the secular Israeli classroom, connecting pupils with their heritage, and educating towards religious pluralism in the Jewish state.

 

The Masorti Movement is committed to a pluralistic, egalitarian, and democratic vision of Zionism. Masorti represents a “third” way. Not secular Judaism. Not ultra-Orthodoxy. But a Jewish life that integrates secular beliefs. Halakhah with inclusion and egalitarianism. Tradition that recognizes the realities of today’s world. Masorti engages tens of thousands of Israelis each year, young and old, native born as well as olim from around the globe.
Contact The Kehilla
דג כדגכ
8 Harel Street, POB. 5041, Ashkelon 78150, Israel | Tel: 08-6711370/1 | Fax: 08-63737656 | kehillat@zahav.net.il